Mutual has purchased assets from The Rye Agency and our new website will launch in 2017.

Does That Sound Counter Productive? Yep! Is it? Nope.

Let's be honest: you can't and shouldn't do everything your customers tell you. If you did that your business and your site would be out of control. Where would you draw the line?

Collecting every bit of feedback that comes your way is tedious and pointless. You have to collect it, review it, action it, archive it, back it up, blah blah blah. It's a waste of time. It's a chore. And because it's a chore it'll be ignored and swept under the rug.

Here's The Solution

When you get a bit of feedback put down the pen and open your ears. What are they saying? Listen and then move on with your day.

...And Here's Why it's Brilliant

The feedback that matters will be told to you time and time again until you have no choice but to take action. Good feedback is shared by many.

If every time you show somebody your site they say, "could you zoom in a little bit?" then it should be loud and clear that you need to up your font size. Feedback noted. But if one person out of 100 has a problem with your font size then it's no biggie.

It's why design by committee never works. It's people collecting feedback because they're asked to collect feedback. You will never hear a committee saying "Does it matter? Not really, let's move on to something that does." but without fail you'll hear "Can we make the logo bigger?". Spoiler: nobody ever left a website because the logo was too small.

There's a TV show called The Pitch. The show has 2 advertising agencies pitch for the same work with only a week to pull it off. In a recent episode a young agency that played by their own rules quickly figured out a good solution. The other Mad Men-esque agency went straight into user feedback and focus groups. One lady proclaims, "I think this is unprofessional" and like seagulls all other participants proclaimed "I THINK IT'S UNPROFESSIONAL TOO. MINE. MINE. MINE. MINE.".

The agency that worried about gathering all the feedback lost the job. Why? Because one lady got it wrong, and the other participants became echos of her wrong-ness (that's a word).

Stop collecting feedback. The feedback that matters will come up so often you have no choice but to listen.